workaholic, life of a workaholic, tips for work stress, stress from work, managing work stress

Life of a Workaholic | 5 Lessons Learned From Overworking

Raise your hand if you’ve ever over-worked! *raises hand*

As a workaholic, it’s easy to get lost in your job and lose focus on how much you time you actually spend at work. Overworking is something I would wish on no one, but is something that I’m convinced a lot of people struggle with. Overworking is common – so save yourself the time and mental turmoil, and check out 5 lessons that overworking teaches you.

Burn Out Should Be Avoided At All Costs.

Have you ever found a song you really like, and play it on repeat? For like a day? And then you can’t stand it any more because it’s all you listened to for 24 hours straight? Well that’s burn out. I burnout songs quicker than anyone else and I kind of enjoy running a song through it’s lifespan, but burnout can happen in other places too. Avoiding burnout at work should be a main priority, especially for a workaholic. Instead of laboring over your laptop or computer into the late night hours – take a much needed break, go make a meal, or even go workout! Burnout can negatively effect your production at work and can cause some tension and stress. Burnout can lead to losing motivation and feeling stagnant – which never ends well for yourself or your career.

Avoiding burn out can be managed by acknowledging the signs heading towards it. Manage your work schedule – don’t work late or start work early every single day. Listen to your body – if you need a break, take one. Maintain a healthy level of stress – If your stress levels feel through the roof every day, it might be time to take some time off. Cut yourself some slack and avoid work burn out.

Taking Time For Yourself Is Okay (And Should Be Encouraged).

You should not be nervous to take a day off – in fact you should be encouraged. Working so much every day makes it difficult to take time off and disconnect from work. Feeling so attached to work is not good for anyone’s mental health. You don’t have to overwork to feel productive. Taking time off helps you refocus and reset. It makes you more productive at the end of the day!

Give Yourself Realistic Expectations.

Sometimes we expect ourself to do the job of 4 different people – and we convince ourself that doing the job of 4 different people is manageable, doable, and something we can maintain for a long period of time. When in fact, convincing ourself of those things can be a huge issue. Setting realistic expectations in the workplace for yourself, and to hire-ups, can help you be productive and accountable, while not allowing yourself to get incredibly stressed out and overworked. Moral of the story here is don’t bite off more than you can chew – don’t set unrealistic goals for yourself, you are only setting yourself up for failure.

Your Mental Health Matters The Most.

Working is a huge part of everyone’s lives – it’s how we afford to live and support those who matter most to us. People spend a majority of their lives working (and commuting to and from work). If you are unhappy or stressed out from work, or working too much, know that you can remove yourself from that situation and find employment elsewhere. Just because you’ve worked somewhere for a long time or thought that a job was your “dream job” doesn’t mean that you have to stay. Stay in touch with your feelings and make sure you are happy and that your mental health is in good standings.

It’s Okay To Say No.

Struggling to handle the things on your plate at work and then you’re asked to do more? It’s ok to say no. You are helping yourself maintain your sanity and you should not be ashamed for doing that. In fact being realistic and saying no to a higher up shows those above you that you can be realistic and value your current workload. Showing that you are invested in what you are doing and want to keep 100% of your energy in one place shows focus and dedication. A boss wouldn’t want you so spread thin that you aren’t able to complete any tasks. Remember that it’s ok to say no.


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